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Now that's what i call soul : Sonny Boy Williamson, 'Bye bye bird'



comment on youtube:

Damn! Talk about creating a mountain with a handful of sand. Sonny does so much with so little with this number. Damn. Damn. I can't begin to imagine what america would be like without these real blacks. They didn't stop feeling despite being held down.  That is the greatest victory in the face of oppression.  To feel less as a consequence of being oppressed is the greatest loss.  

Can you feel the soul?  You should feel it in your diaphragm.  A heavy feeling.  A real feeling.   Such deep passion.  I'm humbled.  That's a good thing.  Gives me something more to aspire to.


ed


5 comments:

  1. Unfortunately, I can’t say the same about the minorities in Singapore who faced racial discrimination (chinese preferred for job opportunities in the earlier decades), unequal treatments (promotion of chinese culture over the others). If you observe, say the Indians in today’s singapore, they have been assimilated into the chinese society. There is hardly any trace of Indian traits (their passions, vibrancy, intellects), that I saw in the 70’s and 80’s, today. One reason that the blacks in America are able to continue to feel despite facing oppression is that they are still within their own community, and thus able to draw support from each other and keep their culture alive while the Indians in singapore were fragmented because of the HDB quota system. I suppose that's why it is difficult for them to keep their culture and practice being ‘Indian’.

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  2. You're spot on John. If you think about it, even if they are fragmented amongst the chinese, they can still keep practicing at being an Indian/Malay/Creative/Intelligent/etc if the chinese are responsive. But they aren't. Hence, there is no response.

    And in an effort to 'get along' - which is another way of saying 'just being what the chinese are accustomed to' - they just talk about 'common interests'. It's no wonder that a post such as this gets no response here - even from my 'friends' and other 'intelligent' people who've commented here in the past and whom have seen this post.

    It's the same thing when you talk about what's in this post in face-to-face interaction with anyone in singapore these days. No response. So when these singaporeans talk about their being 'creative', you know that they are talking from a highly underdeveloped point of view and character, and hence, as i'm inclined to say, 'they wouldn't know true creativity even if kicked them in the prostate'. Haha.

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  3. That was inspiring..bye bye birdie, you can see all the pain, the suffering that they were going through....yet....I have no words..man

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  4. "chinese preferred for jobs opportunities in the earlier decades", I take it John, that you had had your job for a long while now as it is still being practice today. As for the demise of the other cultures in singapore,that is the strategy of divide and conquer. Singapore being the size of a 'parking lot' compared to the States, leaves us no chance to maintain or keep our cultures alive...to top it, most of the indians have left this parking lot for the 'Freeway'...

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  5. Funny analogy with the 'parking lot' and 'freeway' thing man. There aren't many who can talk that way today in singapore. You an Indian?

    Yup. I'd say those multicultural Indians who still had their intelligence and vibrancy intact left the state in the 90s. I know a few myself who left for because of governmental and 'majority' 'tolerance' - i.e. 'tolerance' meaning, knowing you exist but can't be bothered because you're not same-same with them. Not all are like that of course. But enough to make the Indians i know leave.

    Those who couldn't, stayed and had to adapt, and became less. As for their children, and contemporary 'indians', many just ended up becoming less from the start and hence didn't aspire to more than 'their place' in the scheme of things. Thus, they don't find a problem with the way things are. Problems only arise when you don't allow yourself to be underdeveloped and then, having become more than the norm, find that you're marginalised or ignored for not keeping to your place, doing what the majority do, and just playing 'follow the leader' with the government and the majority.

    Personally, i don't fancy becoming just a 'eater, shitter, shopper and gambler' just to 'get along' (singapore's 'culture' is eating, shopping and gambling isn't it). It's all about the 'market' produced after singapore was confucianised. There isn't a market to respond to intelligence and creativity. Personally, i've had quite a few chinese friends look at my artwork or music and say, 'donno how to appreciate'. To be honest. I find that pretty much sub-normal as i can appreciate any kind of art/music/ideas and especially if it is different. But that's the norm of the majority today. So i suppose that is 'normal'.

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