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on the arrest of the 3 youths for racist comments - in conversation

The following 'conversation' is extracted from 3in1Kopitiam, and which provided me with the opportunity to consider the issue further.

On a side note, I would recommend the aforementioned site to bloggers. The problem in a fascist state transitioning to what I would term 'democratic fascism'(as it is now) is that, amongst others, people tend to stick to their mutually supporting groups and not consider anything contradictory, or dismiss it as evidence of the critic's support for the 'other side'. Greater ideas cannot be produced where there is no dialectical result from the mutual consideration of contradictory ideas. 3in1Kopitam goes some way in addressing this by its existence.

Alright, on to the issue...



Raffles1823:
“Chinese teenage racists on Facebook or anywhere else should be taken to task by other Chinese.

Having an Indian complain against these teenagers leaves a bad taste in my mouth

If our children do anything wrong, its the parents who should take action, not outsiders.... especially neighbours...even if they were to be the victims of the kid's bad behaviour.

Let us handle our own kids in our own way. Other races, please dont make things worse by lodging Police Reports against kids....

Do you agree with my observation?”

a2ed:
Yes. That has been my point in quite a few of my articles.

Whilst people's attention might be focused on the 3, i'm focused on the 2000 or so members of the site who might have kept silent.

Without the apathy of the majority, the minority of racists cannot get away with what they do - whether they are teenagers or any government.

These 3 are the symptoms, and not the cause. In that, they themselves are victims of what might probably be an overarching racist status quo that produces, on the one hand, academic/economic/achievements amongst the 'preferred', whilst producing negative perceptions of others. When we promote one race and culture over all others, we are also encouraging negative views of the less preferred, underachievement amongst the less preferred, and achievement of the preferred at the expense of the less preferred.

I would, like yourself, prefer to educate the chinese into empathy as opposed to threatening them with police action. The former encourages moral internalisation, whereas the latter causes racism to mutate into more socially acceptable forms, i.e., ignoring the interests of other ethnicities and cultures which is the typical experience in singapore, as opposed to, for instance, the United Kingdom.


Goodnessm1:

Yes. Agree 100% is always the Malays, Indians against the Chinese. Whereas the Chinese they don't mine and would brush it off. The police would take such matters as serious crimes.

a2ed:
The Chinese might 'brush it off' as you might say because they've got the advantaged end of the stick. Every chinese in the country would know that whatever the Malays and Indians might say about them, they are still going to be representing the nation in beauty pageants, have a chance to be PM, be the majority in significant posts in the military and government, and always be preferred when it comes to jobs. When one is already up there over all, they aren't going to bother about the grumbles that go on below are they.


MadmanSG:
but is a fact that chinese use ‘ar pu neh neh’ as monster to scare their kids into good behavior? then like that must as well put the entire chinese population into prison.

a2ed:
Yes. I think quite a few have been doing it for decades. I heard it as a child, and my sister recently told me about how she went to Popular book store with a her kids and a chinese kid went up to her, pointed at her, and said, 'ah pu neh'. That is the singaporean experience for you. Nothing 'Indian' or 'Malay' about it (ar pu neh). But if the Chinese don't know how to check on the racist mentality of some of their own, or even the bigoted approaches by the government, people cannot be taken to task for assuming all of them to be a problem in their apathy-cum-racism.

I've personally experienced racism myself, by way of 'mama', 'black', etc, but what I find absolutely appalling is how other chinese whom are around just carry on completely unbothered. Whilst I have many chinese friends with whom i'm popular, I cannot but say their apathy is absolutely appalling. Psychologically speaking, this indicates a gross lack of empathy for anyone, regardless of race, or their deeming nothing amiss, and which indicates their own racist perceptions. Either way, it's unacceptable.

In the UK, i would not be able to have a negative perception of the 'whites' as whilst there may be a gathering of a couple of hundred 'white' racists, there will be a couple of thousand 'white' anti-racists to stand up against them. Can that be said of singapore? Be honest now.


*

a2,

ed

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