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MJ: on the 'This is Not It' Movement, and why it certainly isn't


So now this sad group of gits have decided to start a ‘This is not it’ movement gnashing their teeth whilst beating their breasts in sackcloth and ashes, probably in tune with ‘Don’t stop till you get enough’, for the exploitative treatment received by what they believe to be ‘the greatest entertainer that ever lived’ in the hands of the corporations. According to these ‘fans’, Michael Jackson, hallowed be His name, died due to the ‘neglect, greed and inhumanity’ of Sony et al.

“Michael Jackson needed help,” goes the Manifesto on the ‘This is not it’ site, “but they were too busy relishing the profits this tour would have generated to acknowledge it. AEG, the tour promoter, and Michael's own entourage, pressed on and did not intervene to stop what clearly looked like a tragedy in waiting. It was inhumane.” This is not it



Well, millions dying all over the world needed help too mate. But because some crotch-clutching hoo haa-ing git thought there was nothing wrong in hoarding millions for doing that ‘like sooo well’, and millions of perpetually pubescent minds were devolved enough to think nothing of it, this tragedy has been in the making. Daily.

Frankly, whilst I’m certainly inclined to do a jig and a half whenever I hear Michael’s ‘Rock with you’, I can now only do so whilst trying not to think about how this bloke actually thought that millions ought to die so that he could play with his train set and chimps, whilst we enable him to do just that so that we could feel like doing the said jig and a half. After all, that is the final cost isn’t it. Of course those whom are too busy getting vicarious erections watching MJ’s impromptu crotch dips and facial contortions, that would probably flabbergast even the most adept plate-balancers from China, would miss this point. And very soon, thanks to these self-absorbed species known by the term of ‘fans’, we’re going to see singers being appointed to the UN, speaking up for the poor whilst crotched in their multi-million dollar living rooms, and heading profit-generating mass song-and-dance festivals for causes which probably wouldn’t exist if all the billions paid out to mere singers and recording companies went directly to the needy. Short cuts past thought frequently takes the route past thought-relieving celebrity-worship. That’s what served as the basis for the emergence of Hitlers, Griffins, Woods, Beckhams, Jackson, et al. It is the devaluation of the individual that serves as the cornerstone for much that is taken as unquestionable ‘culture’ of today and the gross mishaps of history.

It seems that these cultural heroes, be they stick-swinging Woods, ball-kicking Beckhams, or crotch-swiveling Jacksons, just about take the biscuit in the Exploitation Sanitation Department. They whitewash exploitation by rendering it immediately gratifying for the electorate of the morrow. That certainly undermines any movement toward equity in the economic sphere given the pleasures associated with it in the ‘entertainment’ one.

Well, if I have any bouts of indigestion arising from MJ’s death, it is in his not taking his fans with him.

Ooh, that's a bit harsh isn't it.

Yes, it would be, if the systemic and humanitarian consequences of 'fanhood' weren't.

according2,


ed


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